Final Assembly and Wiring

We are now ready to do the final assembly and wiring. First attach the turntable assembly to the chassis assembly using four 8-32 bolts as shown below:

Then zip tie the Battery to the underside of the robot as shown below:

Next we are going to make the cable that will connect the main Arduino Board to the Auxiliary Arduino board. Take a 20 cm section of five wire male to male connectors and insert each end into a 1×5 housing. Since the order of the wires are different for the two connectors, care must be taken to get them in the correct order.

The easiest way to do that is to label the connections on each end, 4RVG5 for the Auxiliary Arduino Board and R45GV for the main Arduino Board. Then match up the wires correctly as shown above. The actual colors of the wires you use doesn’t matter as long as they are connected in the correct order on each side.

Now use this cable to connect the Arduino Board to the Auxiliary Arduino Board as shown below:xxx

Next, route the cable for the Shooter Motor over to the right top Motor Controller. Cut the red and black power wire to an appropriate length and connect them to the Motor Controller as shown below:

Now route the four Shooter Motor encoder wires to the main Arduino Board and cut them to an appropriate length. Then crimp male connectors onto the Encoder AEncoder VCC, and Encoder GND wires and insert them into one side of a 2×3 housing as shown below:

Since the colors of the wires that you used for your cable are likely different from mine, you should refer to the cable connection on the turret for the corresponding colors (see picture to the right above). Also since we will only be spinning this motor in one direction, we will only need the speed and not the direction, hence the Encoder B wire is not used.

Now route the cable for the Feeder Motor to the left Motor Controller. Cut the red and black power wires to the appropriate length and connect them to the left Motor Controller as shown below:

Then route the four Feeder Motor encoder wires to the main Arduino Board and cut them to an appropriate length. Then crimp male connectors onto the Encoder A, Encoder VCC, and Encoder GND wires and insert them into the other side of the 2×3 housing as shown below:

Once again, make sure that the wires are inserted into the casing in the correct order. Also, as was the case for the Shooter Motor, we will not need to know the direction of the motor so the Encoder B wire is not used.

Then route the power wires for the LED over to the left Motor Controller and connect them as shown below. Make sure that you connect them with the proper polarity.

Next, mount the Turntable Motor to the Turntable Motor Mount using two M3 screws and attach the Timing Belt Pully to the shaft using the two set screws. Then mount the Turntable Motor Mount to the Turntable Bottom Plate using two 8-32 bolts, and loop the Timing Belt around the pully, as shown below. You should slide the Turntable Motor Mount to tighten the belt. The belt should be snug, but not too tight. It should be loose enough that, if you turn the turntable by hand, the belt will slip on the pully.

Then attach the Turntable Motor power wires to the Motor Controller as shown below:

Next take the loose end of the Pi Camera Cable and tape a piece of duct tape on the end as shown to protect it:

Then temporarily remove the Arduino Board and connect the Camera Cable to the Raspberry Pi as shown:

Then re-attach the Arduino Board:

Now take four 20cm and three 30cm male to female jumper cables and create the following wiring harness. Pay attention to the order of the wires that are inserted into each of the housing:

Now plug the four pin male connector into the Arduino Board as shown:

Then plug the four pin female connector into the right Motor Controller as shown:

Now plug the three pin female connector into the left Motor Controller as shown:

Now feed the two pin male connector for the Turntable Control and the single pin male connector for the Light Control through the hole to the underside of the board. Then insert these connectors into the 1×9 connector that is plugged into the Auxiliary Arduino Board as shown:

Next cut two 14 inch two wire ribbon cable and crimp male connectors to one end. Then insert the connectors into a 2×3 housing as shown.

Then plug the connector into the Arduino Board as shown:

Now solder the other ends to the limit switches as shown:

Now assemble the shooter Flywheel by gluing the Flywheel Cap to the Flywheel. When the glue has dried, attach two  7/8″ ID, 1-1/8″ OD, 1/8″ width O-Rings as shown below:

Now attach the Flywheel to the Shooter Motor centered as shown below. You want a snug fit. Depending on your 3D printer you may find that the fit is too snug (i.e. you cannot get it on to the motor spindle), or too loose. If it is too snug, drill the hole in the Flywheel with a 2 mm drill. If it is too loose you can add just a drop of glue from a hot glue gun and then immediately push the Flywheel onto the spindle. I caution you against using a more permanent glue (such as super glue) as that will make it impossible to remove the Flywheel later if you find the need. The hot glue will hold well enough and will still allow you to remove the Flywheel later.

The robot is now complete and ready for programming.